William H. Boyland (1866 – 1935)
& Belle W. Westfall Boyland (1872 – 1963)

By Doris Davis-Fritsch

William H. Boyland or Boylan, was born in Parma N.Y to parents Hugh and Louise Boyland. He lived on his parents’ farm with 6 siblings. He received his education in the county schools in Parma and West Greece. After his boyhood days were over at the age of 16, Mr. Boyland went to work at the Hill Brothers in Penfield village and worked 3 years in what was considered a “model mill”.

In 1884, he came to Fairport and worked in the feed and flourmill of George W. Clark that stood where the Rochester, Syracuse and Eastern Railway Trolley Station stood (23 N. Main St.). Wood and Traver bought the mill from Clark, and Mr. Boyland remained with the new firm for several years, and then he went into the feed mill business for himself in Spencerport, NY.

His stay in that town was short, only two years. He came back to Fairport to live in approximately 1892. Shortly after returning, Boyland bought the Fairport Mill[2] as it was called then and continued business on North Main with a partner. He bought out the partner in 1901.[3] He bought feed of all kinds, bought wheat andmanufactured pastry flour, which he sold at retail and wholesale. The wholesale business became large, shipping to in New York City and Boston by the carloads.[4]

The mill building along with a barn was moved to John Street (11 State, now Lift Bridge) when the Rochester, Syracuse and Eastern Railway Company bought the property on Main Street. He continued business there until his death in 1935. The Boyland estate owned the building and equipment and the business was sold to C. H. Maier.[5] Much of the building was destroyed in a 1940 fire.[6] Mr. Maier’s business remained open, but it appears that he moved to a Main Street location near the railroad station.

In 1890, Mr. Boyland married Miss Belle (possibly Blanche) Dudley Westfall[7], the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. V. Westfall, of the village.[8] They started housekeeping in the Woodin house on Church Street [9] and then moved to Perrin Street. After two years spent in Spencerport they, upon their return lived in part of the Congregational Church parsonage with Rev. Charles Reeves, then moved to 30 West Street[10], which they later purchased in 1910.[11]

While in Fairport, Mr. Boyland was superintendent of the First Methodist Sunday school for five years. He later joined the First Baptist church and for one term was one of the trustees. He also was a village trustee for one term in 1905/1906[12] and a member of the Masonic Lodge. Mrs. Boyland was involved in the Eastern Star. She also was involved in the Musical Club, sang at Church events and offered her talent for weddings, evenings at home and funerals.[13]

After Mr. Boyland death in 1938[1], Belle Boyland owned the home until 1960 when it was sold to Mr. and Mrs. Lester.[14] She died 3 years later at age 81.[15] To date, the Boylands' ownership of the home was the longest, 50 years.

 


[1]U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current - Ancestry.com, Monroe Cty Mail 11.7.1915 states 1864

[2] Fairport Herald Mail 11.7.1915

[3] Fairport Herald Mail 1.2.1901

[4] Fairport Herald Mail 11.7.1915

[5] Fairport Herald Mail 6.16.1938

[6] Fairport Herald Mail 2.1.1940

[7] West Street, Fairport: Then and Now An Oral History by Kathryn Parke & Barbara Butler 1919 to 1947

[8] Fairport Herald 11.7.1915

[9] Plat Map 1872 - H. J. Woodin owned 11 West Church St

[10] Fairport Herald Mail 11.7.1915

[11] Property Abstract

[12] Monroe Cty Mail 3.16.1905

[13] Fairport Herald 11.3.1915 and Monroe County Mail 12.27.1906

[14] Property Abstract

[15] Greenvale Cemetery Records

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Individual stories about the owners of this property can be found in the Personage section of this webpage or click the name below.

Austin R. & Mary Conant

Celestia Ayrault & Emily Ayrault Hobbie

Issac S. Hobbie

William & Belle Boyland

Dingbat

National Listing of Historic Places  

Owners of National Register listed properties can take advantage of the New York State Historic Homeowners Tax Credit program and/or the State and Federal Commercial Rehab Tax Credit programs. Each program provides tax credits worth 20% of qualified rehab expenses.(2016)

For more information about the National Register.


WestSt30v1DDFritsch2016PR

The current owners (2016) are planning to use the NYS tax credit to help in the final conversion from the 3 family residences into a single family home.

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The truss designs have four outside triangle sections with cutout patterns. The inside sections are arched.

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From the corner of each of three gable are large pendants with chamfered edges, finial and cut-work brackets.

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The south side has a bay window on the first floor, a double window above with a Gothic hood and elaborate truss.

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The details on the bay windows include operable shutters and shed-like hoods. Pendants drip from the corners have cut-work brackets.


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The southwest and northwest porches posts are supported by stick-like chamfered brackets. This type of bracket also supports the bay window.

 

 

 

 

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