Preserving Our Village Heritage:

The Fairport Historic Preservation Commission

The Commission’s Role

In the village, the Fairport Historic Preservation Commission (FHPC) is charged with implementation of the Fairport Historic Preservation Local Law which was passed in June 2007. The Commission seeks to protect, enhance and perpetuate Fairport landmarks in a manner consistent with our changing society, and by so doing promote the economic, cultural, educational and general welfare of the village and its residents.

The Commission has developed a consistent set of procedures for the designation process, ensuring proper consideration of individual properties and to preserve structures that provide historical significance and architectural beauty to Fairport. Properties under consideration must meet at least one of the criteria specified by the law and in many cases meet several of these criteria.

Landmark Designation

Stabilize & Increase Property Value

Studies show that local designation of landmarks can stabilize and often increase property value. Landmark status can increase sale potential and loan value due to lending institutions’ perception of greater value.

There is also the gratification in owning an identified structure of architectural and/or historic integrity. Designation insures that the building’s special historic, architectural or cultural character will be protected from destructive or insensitive rehabilitation in the future.

Special History or Architecture

WestStreet42v3WebA landmark is a property or building designated by the FHPC as significant to the village because of its history or architecture. When a property has been designated as an historic landmark, the village of Fairport officially recognizes that the property has special historic and/or architectural value and that the property is an important part of our heritage.

 

Martin Wood house at 42 West Street is regarded as the best example of Greek Revival architecture in Fairport. Martin Wood was a local farmer and built the house in 1851. The farm extended from West Street to Woodlawn, which was named for him.

Criteria for Designation

Once a landmark has been tentatively designated the Commission will conduct a public hearing to determine if the property meets one or more of the standards for designation. The property owner is notified and encouraged to attend and participate in the hearing.

A property may be designated as a landmark based on one or more of the following five criteria:

  • Possess special character or historic or aesthetic interest or value as part of the cultural, political, economic or social history of the locality, region, state or nation;
  • Is identified with historic personages;
  • Embodies the distinguishing characteristics of an architectural style;
  • Is the work of a designer whose work has significantly influenced an age; or
  • Because of a unique location or singular physical characteristic, represents an established and familiar visual feature of a neighborhood.

mainst.bridgev1ddfritsch2010webPer the Landmark Society, the Main Street Lift Bridge is "one of the most unusual bridges in NYS". F. P. Williams designed the 1914 circa bowstring structure.
It has no two angles the same and there are no square corners on the bridge.

Changing Landmark Buildings

Maintaining an Historic Property

Normal maintenance that does not alter the appearance of a landmark property would not require approvals from the FHPC. Examples are repairing windows or replacing a roof with like material. A change in paint color would NOT require review of the Commission.

Changes That Require Approvals

Any change in appearance of a landmark property including exterior alteration, restoration, reconstruction, demolition, new construction or moving of a landmark property, that is visible from the public way, will require the property owner to apply for a Certificate of Appropriateness (COA).

This does not mean changes cannot be made, but the FHPC must review the proposed changes and find them to be appropriate. The FHPC will look at overall design and scale of the project to determine whether it is compatible with the landmark building. Materials, window size and arrangement, roof shape, consistency with architectural features and placement will be reviewed.

s.main200v1ddfritsch2010webIf an element of the property, such as a brick fence, has been specifically mentioned in the landmark designation, the Commission would require a COA application to determine how the proposed change might alter that element.

The Commission is knowledgeable about architectural styles and materials and can suggest resources and style details that would enhance a landmark structure’s new construction or restoration project.

Martin Sperbeck bought 100 acres in 1817 and built a blockhouse of squared timbers at 200 S. Main. His brother, a trapper, built a cabin where the Village Hall is now. Legend states that the path between the two residences became South  Main Street. Since designation in March 2009, the front porch has been lovingly recreated.

 

Application Process

A Certificate of Appropriateness (COA) is needed before any work on exterior changes to a designated landmark begins.

Application forms are available from the village building department and will require plans, maps and drawings of the proposed project. The applicant or agent will appear before the FHPC to explain the proposed changes. This process ensures that special qualities of landmark buildings are not compromised or destroyed.

If a COA is required for a project, it is in addition to and not in lieu of any other permits or approvals that may be required for a project of that type. If a proposal also requires Zoning and/or Planning Board approval, the applications can be made at the same time.

Commission Meetings

Regularly scheduled meetings are generally on the first Thursday of the month at the Village Hall Board Room, 31 South Main Street Fairport, 14450 and are open to the public.

For more information on the FHPC and designated landmarks, go to the village website.

 

Designated Structures and Historic Sites in the village of Fairport:

Fairport Historical Museum
18 Perrin Street

perrin18johnjongen2008prespg

Designated 2008

Bank of America
58 South Main Street

s.main58v2ddavisfritsch2009prespg

Designated 2008

1st Baptist Church
94 South Main Street

southmain94_v6_phs2009prespg

Designated 2008

Kraii House
84 South Main Street

s.main84v1phs2008prespg

Designated 2008

Kraii Carriage House
84 South Main Street

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Designated 2008


Wilbur House
187 South Main Street

s.main187prespage

Designated 2008

Deland House - Green Lantern Inn
1 East Church Street

eastchurch1_v6prespg

Designated 2008

Reed - Hulburt House
106 Hulburt Road

hulburt106v1jwhitney2008prespg

Designated 2009 

Martin Sperbeck House
200 South Main Street

s.main200v1ddavisfritsch2010prespg

Designated 2009

Abner Wight House
234 South Main Street

s.main234v1bporay2009prespg

Designated 2009

McAuliffe - Fisk House
100 West Church Street

w.church100v4phs2010prespg

Designated 2009 

Main Street Lifebridge
Main & Erie Canal

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Designated 2009

Congregational Church
26 East Church Street

e.church26v1ddfritsch2008prespg

Designated 2009

Martin Wood House
42 West Street

weststreet42v3ddfritsch2007prespg

Designated 2009

Potter Memorial
53 West Church

w.church53v2ddfritsch2011prespg

Designated 2010


Seeley House
83 West Avenue

westave83v2jwhitney2010prespg

Designated 2010

John E. Howard House
70 South Main Street

s.main70v1bporay2010prespg

Designated 2010

Daniel, Minerva Deland House & Barn
185 North Main Street

n.main185v1ddf2010prespg

Designated 2011

Newman - Dean House
11 West Church Street

w.church11v15ddavisfritsch2010prespg

Designated 2011

Hitching Posts & Mounting Blocks
18 Locations

westave111v1phs2009prespg

Designated 2011

Trolley Station
23 North Main Street

n.main23v16ddfritsch2011prespg

Designated 2011 

Warner - Golia House
25 Woodlawn Avenue

woodlawn25v1ddfritsch2009prespg

Designated 2011 

Cook - Ewell House
182 West Church Street

w.church182ddfritsch2008prespg

 Designated 2012

Dobbin House
141 West Avenue

westave141v3ddfritsch2010prespg

 Designated 2012

Parker Street Bridge
Parker & Erie Canal

parkerst.bridgev12ddfritsch2011prespg

Designated 2012 

Greenvale Cemetery
East Church Street

mageecrossddfritsch2012prespg

 Designated 2012

Filkens - Carroll House
110 Hulburt Road

hulburt110v2ddfritsch2009prespg

Designated 2012 

Pure Oil Building
99 South Main Street

s.main99v19ddfritsch2013prespg

 Designated 2013

Kellogg House
126 West Avenue

westave126v3ddfritsch2012prespg

Designated 2013

Newman - Cotter

112 West Avenue

WestAve112v1K.Boas4.13.2010PresPg

Designated 2013

Rochester Telephone
56 West Avenue

WestAve56v1DDFritsch2011PresPg

Designated 2013

Davis - Starenko
155 South Main Street

S.Main155v3DDFritsch2012prevpg

Designated 2014

Yawman House & Barn
42 Woodlawn Avenue

Woodlawn42v2DDFritsch2014PR

Designated 2014

Eldridge House & Barn
48 West Church St.

W.Church48v1DDFritsch2011PresPg

Designated 2014

Cole - Briggs House
116 West Avenue

WestAve116v2J.Whitney2015PR

Designated 2015

Silver House &
Carriage Barn
53 Roselawn Avenue

Roselawn53-v1-2009-DDavisFritsch-Web200

Designated 2016

Conant - Boyland House & Carriage Barn
30 West Street

Designated 2016

 

Cornelia Kraai House
10 Clinton Place

Designated 2017

Potter Historic District
W. Church & Potter Place

Listed on the National Register 2017

Architectural Styles Tour Guide & Quiz

Download the Introduction to Architectural Styles in the Village of Fairport brochure and have fun learning about some of the many architecture styles found in our community.

The guide was prepared by the FHPC using A Field Guide to American Houses, by Virginia & Lee McAllester as a reference. 

Enjoy your tour!

For an index of additional  styles that can be found in the Perinton area go to the Architectural Styles page in the History section.Dingbat

For the Town of Perinton landmarks and historic districts visit the Town of Perinton website.

Search

Designated Structures
& Historic Sites List

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Architectural Styles
Tour Guide & Quiz

Download the Introduction to Architectural Styles in the Village of Fairport brochure and have fun learning about some of the many architecture styles found in our community.

The guide was prepared by the FHPC using A Field Guide to American Houses, by Virginia & Lee McAlester as a reference. 

Enjoy your tour!

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Historic Resources Survey

August 2014 - A survey was taken of the properties in the village of Fairport in 2014. The introduction to the 2014 survey gives good detail about the background and goals of this document.

It is important for the reader to realize this is a reconnaissance-level survey, or a "once over lightly" inspection of the village. It forms a basis for more intensive research on a structure. The survey which covers structures built before 1970, was conducted by Bero Architecture. The historic research was done by the Fairport Historic Preservation Commission (FHPC).

If a property is listed in this document, it does not mean it is a designated landmark. To designate a property, extensive research is completed by the FHPC, the property owner is notified and a public hearing is held allowing the owner and the public to comment on the proposed designation.

This document provides the basis for future designations. It was paid for with a State Historic Preservation Office Grant and a second Grant from Fairport Office of Community and Economic Development.

Members of FHPC in 2014: Doris-Davis-Fritsch, Charles Smith, John Wierzbicki, and Tim Wagner

Jean H. Whitney, Chairperson
Fairport Historic Preservation Commission

A PDF of the Historic Resources Survey of the Village of Fairport is available on the village website.

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KraaiCarriageHouseFront2008Web200

This carriage house at 84 South Main Street was built circa, 1885. Brackets below the eaves are from the Italianate period, the same style as the home. The interior doors move on huge hinges and the small windows facing north are for the horse stalls.

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"Preservation helps to maintain a community's unique identity and connection to earlier times, events and people."

Jean Keplinger
Town Historian (1997 -2012)

 

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234_SMain_01Web200

This early 1800's farmhouse at 234 South Main Street was built by Abner Wight. He married Huldah Perrin, sister to Glover Perrin, an original settler. Their son, Asa, was the first white child born here, who lived to adulthood.

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"It is important to preserve buildings that have distinct architectural characteristics of a period, and that may also have historical significance. Such preservation makes the Village a charming and desirable place to live."

C. Douglas and Susan Angevine

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SouthMain58v2Web400

The bank at 58 South Main Street was built in 1924 in the Renaissance Revival style popular at the time for important civic and commercial buildings. It represents strength, permanence and pride and is a good example of traditional Main Street style.

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"Our renovation and roof project required a COA. The Commission's approval required several changes. Everything historic preservation suggested made the project better."

Chic Gray
First Congregational Church of Christ

DingbatDesignated Structures & Historic Sites

Fairport Historical Museum 
18 Perrin Street

Bank of America,
58 South Main Street

First Baptist Church of Fairport 
92 South Main Street

Kraai House,
84 South Main Street

Kraai Carriage House
84 South Main Street

Wilbur House
187 South Main Street

DeLand House - Green Lantern Inn
1 East Church Street

Reed-Hulburt House 
106 Hulburt Road

Sperbeck House 
200 South Main Street

Abner - Wight House 
234 South Main Street

McAuliffe - Fisk House 
100 West Church Street

Main Street Lift Bridge
Main Street and the Erie Canal (Route 250)

First Congregational United Church of Christ
26 East Church Street

Martin Wood House
42 West Street

Potter Memorial
53 West Church Street

Seeley House
83 West Avenue

John E. Howard House 
70 South Main Street

Daniel & Minerva DeLand House & Barn 
185 North Main Street

Newman - Dean House & Barn
11 West Church Street

Hitching Posts & Mounting Blocks (carriage steps)
18 Locations

Trolley Station
26 North Main Street

Warner - Golia House
25 Woodlawn Avenue

Cook - Ewell House
182 West Church Street

Dobbin House & Carriage Barn 
141 West Avenue

Greenvale Rural Cemetery 
East Church Street

Parker Street Bridge
Parker Street 

Filkins - Carroll House
110 Hulburt Road

Pure Oil Building
99 South Main Street

Kellogg House 
126 West Avenue

Newman - Cotter House
112 West Avenue

Rochester Telephone Exchange
56 West Avenue

Davis-Starenko House
155 South Main Street

Yawman House & Barn
42 Woodlawn Avenue


Eldridge House & Barn
48 West Church Street

Cole - Briggs House
116 West Avenue

Silver House & Carriage Barn
53 Roselawn Avenue

Conant - Boyland House & Carriage Barn
30 West Street

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